SPEECH DRAMA & DEBATE EVENTS in india

debate events

NSDA Debate is an elegant, modern form of debate which involves a team of students working to effectively convince a judge that their side of a resolution is, as a general principle, more valid. Students in debate develop balanced leadership skills by researching multiple perspectives extensively to understand both sides of the resolution, and learn to think critically about every argument that could be made on each side. Below are two exciting forms of debate for our Indian students. These events facilitate student collaboration. 

 

1

PUBLIC FORUM DEBATE

Public Forum Debate involves opposing teams of two, debating a topic concerning a current event. Proceeding a coin toss, the winners choose which side to debate (PRO or CON) or which speaker position they prefer (1st or 2nd), and the other team receives the remaining option. Students present cases, engage in rebuttal and refutation, and also participate in a “crossfire” (similar to a cross examination) with the opportunity to question the opposing team.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in Public Forum Debate from NSDA South Dakota alumnus Brett Ries.

 

More About Public Forum Debate:

As a team event, students who compete in Public Forum need to be able to work well with a partner. Balanced teams, both in terms of preparation before debates and contributions within a debate, help provide a competitive advantage during tournaments. PF is a newer form of debate and has become highly popular in the United States. PF is focused upon debating varying resolutions that change frequently, which exposes students to a variety of topics during a single competitive season. Topics in PF look at current events, with students examining issues in depth and learning about key global concerns and debates. Students learn to carefully understand multiple perspectives around the topic and arguments, and deepening the development of their persuasive skills. Students who do Public Forum must be prepared to debate in front of judges who do not have any formal debate training. Being able to persuade a range of judges is a central component to this event.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Public Forum video clip.

2

WORLD SCHOOLS DEBATE

World Schools Debate features a dynamic format combining the concepts of “prepared” topics with “impromptu” topics, encouraging debaters to focus on specified issues rather than debate theory or procedural arguments. This highly interactive style of debate allows debaters to engage each other, even during speeches. This challenging format requires good teamwork and in-depth quality argumentation.

 

More About World Schools Debate:

World Schools Debate is a three-on-three format. Three members of each team participate as speakers advocating their team's position, and are supported by two additional members who lead research and idea generation, working collectively as a five member team. Teams rotate roles and positions so that all five team members learn to effectively collaborate and are exposed to different skills and challenges. Resolutions come in two types: prepared motions and impromptu motions. Teams will be assigned one of two sides in each round- either the government team proposing the motion, or the opposition team advocating the rejection of the motion. Debaters present their position on a topic, refute their opponents, and respond to questions throughout the course of the debate. This is an exciting debate format and rapidly growing globally.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | World Schools Debate video clip.

SPEECH events

Speech involves a presentation by one, two, or sometimes a group of students, judged against a similar type of presentation by others in a round of competition. Speech events range from limited preparation events that require extensive knowledge of current events, to prepared presentations which inform an audience about topics like science, innovations, news and other topics. Below are three exciting forms of speech for our students in India.

 

3

INFORMATIVE SPEECH

Students author and deliver a ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Competitors create the speech to educate the audience on a particular topic. All topics must be informative in nature; the goal is to educate, not to advocate. Visual aids are permitted, but not required. The speech is delivered from memory.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in Informative Speaking from California student Cynthia Yang.

 

More About Informative Speech:

Informative is a speech written by the student with the intent to inform the audience on a topic of significance. Informative gives students the unique opportunity to showcase their personality while educating the audience. An Informative is not simply an essay about the topic—it is a well researched and organized presentation with evidence, logic, and sometimes humor to convey a message. Topics are varied and interesting. Whether it be a new technological advance the audience is unaware of or a new take on a concept that everyone is familiar with, Informative is the students opportunity to teach the audience. Types of topics and structure vary greatly.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Informative Speech video clip.

4

EXPOSITORY

Crafting an original speech, Expository students should describe, clarify, illustrate, or define an object, idea, concept, or process. The speech includes research and is aimed at informing the audience; the goal is to educate, not to advocate. No visual aids are permitted. The time limit is five minutes. The speech is delivered from memory.

 

More About Expository:

Expository speaking is an informative speech that is five minutes long without the use of a visual aid (note: some tournaments permit the use of visual aids but at Nationals none are used). Students who participate in Expository provide unique and interesting information to the audience. An effective Expository introduces them to either a completely new topic or something new about a topic people may know a lot about. The speaker should provide unique insights and explore interesting implications. At its core, Expository Speaking is an informative speech. Students doing Expository may cover topics ranging from an organization to a product , a process or concept.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Expository video clip.

5

IMpromptu speech

Impromptu is a public speaking event where students have seven minutes to select a topic, brainstorm their ideas, outline and deliver a speech. The speech is given without notes and uses an introduction, body, and conclusion. The speech can be light-hearted or serious. It can be based upon prompts that range from nursery rhymes, current events, celebrities, organizations, and more.

WATCH A SAMPLE | Impromptu video clip.

6

INTERNATIONAL EXTEMP

Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to international current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the internet during preparation. Topics range from country-specific issues to regional concerns to foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in International Extemporaneous Speaking from Arizona student Vincent Jasso.

 

More About International Extemp:

Extemporaneous Speaking, typically called extemp, is a speech on current events with limited preparation time. A student’s understanding of important political, economic, and cultural issues is assessed along with critical thinking and analytical skills. Students report to a draw room (often referred to as extemp prep) where all of the extempers gather at tables, set out their files, and await their turn to draw topics. Students may access research brought with them to the tournament during the 30-minute preparation period. When prep time is up, the student reports to the competition room to deliver a 7 minute speech.

 

Students have a lot to do in 30 minutes—they must select a question, review research, outline arguments with supporting materials, and practice at least part of the speech before time expires. Many tournaments prohibit the consultation of notes during the speech in which case speech structure and evidence need to be memorized during prep time as well.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | International Extemp video clip.

7

US EXTEMP

Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to current events in the United States and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the internet during preparation. Topics range from political matters to economic concerns to U.S. foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in United States Extemporaneous Speaking from California student Joshua Tran.

 

About United States Extemp:

Extemporaneous Speaking, typically called extemp, is a speech on current events with limited preparation time. A student’s understanding of important political, economic, and cultural issues is assessed along with critical thinking and analytical skills. Students report to a draw room (often referred to as extemp prep) where all of the extempers gather at tables, set out their files, and await their turn to draw topics. Students may access research brought with them to the tournament during the 30-minute preparation period. When prep time is up, the student reports to the competition room to deliver a 7 minute speech. Students have a lot to do in 30 minutes—they must select a question, review research, outline arguments with supporting materials, and practice at least part of the speech before time expires. Many tournaments prohibit the consultation of notes during the speech in which case speech structure and evidence need to be memorized during prep time as well.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | US Extemp video clip.

DRAMA events

Drama involves a presentation by one, two, or sometimes a group of students that is judged against a similar type of presentation by others in a round of competition. Drama events range from dramatic to humorous interpretation, which challenge students to find powerful moments in literature and recreate them for an audience. Pieces can be drawn from existing works of literature or can be original creations.

 

8

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION

Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, this event focuses on the student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance, and state the title and the author.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in Dramatic Interpretation from Ohio student Rachel Rothschild.

 

More About Dramatic Interpretation:

Dramatic Interpretation, contrary to its name, is not all about drama. While dramatic elements are key aspects of the event, melodramatic, or overly-sad selections are not ideal choices for performance. DI lacks props, costuming, sets, and other luxuries seen in various forms of performance art. There is a set time limit of ten minutes, with a thirty second grace period. Students who choose to compete in Dramatic Interpretation should focus on suspending the disbelief of the audience by portraying a realistic, emotional journey of a character(s). The performance should connect to the audience. Students who do Dramatic Interpretation may perform selections on topics of serious social subject matter such as coping with terminal illness; significant historical situations, events, and figures; as well as racial and gender discrimination, suppression, and oppression. Students should select pieces that are appropriate for them. Considerations for selecting a DI topic should include the student’s age, maturity, and school standards.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Dramatic Interpretation video clip.

9

HUMOROUS INTERPRETATION

Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in Humorous Interpretation from Florida student Jordan Singer.

 

More About Humorous Interpretation:

Humorous Interpretation, as its name indicates, is humorous. Competitors often use multi-character selections to tell relatable stories using humor as a device to connect with the audience. Think about your favorite comedian’s latest stand up routine, or something funny that recently happened. Ask yourself why it’s funny. Then ask yourself if that joke would be funny to, say, your mom, or Uncle. Humor is a complex human quirk. Each individual’s sense of humor is unique. However, other aspects of humor are more universal in nature. So, when choosing an HI, it is imperative to consider not only the humorous elements of the selection, but also to keep in mind how the story itself will appeal to the audience. Not everyone will laugh at the same joke, but if a character’s plight is relatable, the audience will identify with him or her. Humor in a Humorous Interpretation should be tasteful and motivated.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Humorous Interpretation video clip.

10

ORIGINAL ORATORY

Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and can be informative or persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.

 

IN THEIR WORDS | Learn what to expect competing in Original Oratory from Indiana student Lia Thayer.

 

More About Original Oratory:

Original Oratory is a speech written by the student with the intent to inform or persuade the audience on a topic of significance. Oratory gives students the unique opportunity to showcase their voice and passion for their topic. An Oratory is not simply an essay about the topic—it is a well researched and organized presentation with evidence, logic, emotional appeals, and sometimes humor to convey a message. Topics may be of a value orientation and affect people at a personal level, such as avoiding peer pressure, or they can be more of a policy orientation and ask an audience to enact particular policies or solve societal problems.

 

WATCH A SAMPLE | Original Oratory video clip.

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